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Makini High School eBooks Installation

The High School started in January 1996. It covers Form 1 to Form 4.

Age’s ranges from 14 Years – 17 Years

There are various academic subjects English, Kiswahili, Chemistry, French, Maths, Biology, Business Studies, Physics, History, Geography, CRE, Music, Art & Design, Computer Studies.

There are various sports including swimming, rugby, among other. Clubs include; presidency Award, G.T.T.P, debate, art, drama among others.

eBooks Installation

eKitabu team comprising Will Clurman, eKitabu CEO, Michael Ngeno, Senior Program Manager, Mercy Musyoki, Marketing Manager, Mercy Kirui, Publishing Account Manager and Linda Kokwaro, Beta Program Manager went to Makini High School.

eKitabu team installed the ebooks in the library computers and tablets to boost their reading by increasing interactivity, interest and variety.

The library staff and some teachers were also trained on how to use ebooks for reading and teaching.

eKitabu_Makini_Huxta_0040                                                        eKitabu CEO, Will Clurman addresses students and staff after the installation

eKitabu_Makini_Huxta_0029                                                        Linda Kokwaro motivates students after the installation

eKitabu_Makini_Huxta_0341                                                         Will Clurman hands a gift hamper to the Principal

eKitabu_Makini_Huxta_0190                                                        Mercy Musyoki explains to the students how to use ebooks

eKitabu_Makini_Huxta_0405                                                        Students all smiles as they read ebooks from a computer

20160202_122047 (1)                                                        Students all smiles as they read ebooks from a tablet

eKitabu_Makini_Huxta_0423                                                        Students all smiles as they read ebooks from a tablet

eKitabu_Makini_Huxta_0355                                                         eKitabu team with the Makini High School Library team

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The future of education is digital-based….This is why.

Hassan Masha, Matiangi and Derrick Karani

Digital education is the use of desktops, laptops or tablets and e-books for learning coupled with / without the use of internet. The e-books can either be online -based where you have to be connected to the internet to access and read them.

E-books can also be off-line based, that is downloaded from a host website (you need internet to access them) however you read them offline on your devices. There are also offline e-books that are loaded on a flash drive or on a memory stick and the e-books loaded on the desktop, laptop or tablet.

Digital education provide self-paced instruction, allow students to instantly review course material, provide the option to review lessons as often as necessary, and gives students the opportunity to explore related topics to provide a broader knowledge base.

But digital learning also helps teachers. They can assign online lectures specifically tailored to support and augment in-class teaching on specific subject matter. Online testing and problem review provide teachers with instantaneous assessment and diagnostics.

Teachers can identify student strengths and adjust their education plans, and they can detect student weaknesses where additional work and remediation is needed.

Failing students sometimes just need more time and repeated attempts to overcome a particular hurdle holding them back from fully grasping a concept. Digital diagnostics help teachers identify those hurdles.

In flipped classrooms, students’ homework assignments are viewing the lectures, and classroom work is solving problems (if necessary, with the help of teachers and peers) and critical, evidence-based writing. This is far from the traditional classroom model.

But if the use of technology is to have differential impact, technology must be made integral to teaching, not supplemental to teaching. Past attempts to integrate new technologies have been half-hearted, at best. Embracing technological change is no longer optional, it is essential.

Human capital development through education must be enhanced. After all, almost 50 percent of our nation’s GDP is in labour costs. At the same time, our students are slipping.

The education industry, which is supposed to prepare us for the future, has been among the slowest to adopt technological change. That has to change.