Category Archives: Industry Thoughts

The future of education is digital-based….This is why.

Hassan Masha, Matiangi and Derrick Karani

Digital education is the use of desktops, laptops or tablets and e-books for learning coupled with / without the use of internet. The e-books can either be online -based where you have to be connected to the internet to access and read them.

E-books can also be off-line based, that is downloaded from a host website (you need internet to access them) however you read them offline on your devices. There are also offline e-books that are loaded on a flash drive or on a memory stick and the e-books loaded on the desktop, laptop or tablet.

Digital education provide self-paced instruction, allow students to instantly review course material, provide the option to review lessons as often as necessary, and gives students the opportunity to explore related topics to provide a broader knowledge base.

But digital learning also helps teachers. They can assign online lectures specifically tailored to support and augment in-class teaching on specific subject matter. Online testing and problem review provide teachers with instantaneous assessment and diagnostics.

Teachers can identify student strengths and adjust their education plans, and they can detect student weaknesses where additional work and remediation is needed.

Failing students sometimes just need more time and repeated attempts to overcome a particular hurdle holding them back from fully grasping a concept. Digital diagnostics help teachers identify those hurdles.

In flipped classrooms, students’ homework assignments are viewing the lectures, and classroom work is solving problems (if necessary, with the help of teachers and peers) and critical, evidence-based writing. This is far from the traditional classroom model.

But if the use of technology is to have differential impact, technology must be made integral to teaching, not supplemental to teaching. Past attempts to integrate new technologies have been half-hearted, at best. Embracing technological change is no longer optional, it is essential.

Human capital development through education must be enhanced. After all, almost 50 percent of our nation’s GDP is in labour costs. At the same time, our students are slipping.

The education industry, which is supposed to prepare us for the future, has been among the slowest to adopt technological change. That has to change.

Why YouTube is becoming a Better educator than our Traditional Class Teachers

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By Jane Nungari Gichuho

YouTube recently celebrated its 10th anniversary. With over 1 billion unique visitors a month, the most surprising viral sensations are located in an unexpected channel: Education. In fact, education videos are viewed twice as often as those found in the Pets & Animals category.

What makes these YouTube educational channels so successful may be the very element of entertainment students may not receive in the classroom. Entertainment is the top priority to keep (viewers’) minds from wandering, and if you’re not getting people engaged, you’re not going to reach a big audience.

YouTube educational content often features a person in front of the camera while others are recorded as procedure e.g. in software training videos. These videos are brimming with personality to convey the information in a humorous, concise manner – better suited to millennial attention spans.

This new generation of online educators succeeds in ways college teachers do not. Most university professors are typically selected for their research output – not their ability to be engaging or even effective conveyors of information. In addition, professors may be more concerned with cramming test material into students’ heads instead of giving them tools to succeed in a self-sufficient way.

Another advantage of a YouTube digital education class, is that it can have more 100, 000 views at a minimum, a size a large lecture hall could never imagine capturing.

The entertainment-engagement appeal may explain the consistent increase in viewership. The quantity of visitors doesn’t just translate into popularity or fame though. It means MONEY.

The larger funding comes from YouTube’s partnership program, which allows content creators to earn 55% of the profit generated by advertisements on their videos. Successful YouTubers often make a sturdy six figures per year – possibly double that of the average high school teacher’s salary.

YouTube has since compiled educational channels into YouTube EDU, which amalgamates the site’s most popular informational videos in a virtually intimate environment. The students can learn on their own time, flexible to their own schedules, with a much vaster network of fellow viewers and teachers to assist their learning.

Educational revolution has in fact been stagnant; students have been taught in groups for centuries. In order to incite a revolution, he says, the key is utilizing the social environment. With social media and the Internet, students are not as afraid to be curious and ask questions. They can search something on Google and get responses immediately; they are not as powerless. They may not have friends who are expert linguists, but there surely are people on Google who are.

What is the value of new media – the Internet? There’s a new toolbox, YouTube and it’s very exciting and vital that we use that for education.

 

Original article: http://www.forbes.com/sites/karenhua/2015/06/23/education-as-entertainment-youtube-sensations-teaching-the-future/